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8 Essential Lessons the German Mannschaft Can Teach Every Business

8 Essential Lessons the German Mannschaft Can Teach Every Business

Last month we witnessed a breathtaking World Cup final which saw the Mannschaft (‘team’) win after a 24 year drought. As well as appearing in the World Cup finals eight times and having won the tournament four times, Germany is now the first European team to have won the cup on Latin American soil.  

Clearly, the German Mannschaft is a fantastic team. After all, we can’t neglect the fact that they played against Argentina, a country which is - unlike Germany - not known for its team but for its star player, Messi, a.k.a “the best player in the world”.

However, do you wonder what their secret was? Was it German efficiency? The quality promise of ‘made in Germany’? Or is there more to it than being German? Coincidence and luck were definitely not part of the equation; for me anyway.

I believe we can learn 8 vital lessons from the team’s performance, attitude and the way they conducted themselves that every business can, and should, learn from.

•    A strong vision: the German team knew what they were about. Combined with a set common goal, hard work, discipline and a positive mindset this creates a powerful entity. If businesses know who they are, what they want and how they want to get there, there is little that can stand in their way.


•    A strategic leader: in a radio interview, Germany’s coach Joachim Löw expressed the team’s confidence in their strength and the ability to stick to their well-established strategy. This comes from good leadership.  It is the leader who gives the team this sense of purpose, direction and commitment to get the job done.


•    Ability to adapt:  as we all know, life doesn’t always go to plan and football is no different. Prior to the final the team lost two key men, Kedhira and Kramer, however the team adapted. Just as with business, it is vital that teams remain flexible and open to situational adaptation, e.g. change of deadline, project amendments, etc.


•    Generational mix: the German team was a perfect balance between old-heads and new blood. One could argue that it was the oldies that kept the team in the final but the new guys such as Götze who won it. In business it’s vital to always have that solid experience as well as new, fresh ideas and impetus.


•    Cultural diversity: the German team had many second-generation Germans such as Mustafi, Özil, Boateng and Podolski. Having people in your business with different backgrounds, experience, ideas and values only strengthens the overall offering and should never be underestimated.


•    Staying focussed: as we saw with the team, when under pressure, and in a critical situations, they never panicked. Panicking is of no help to anyone. For want of a better phrase, it’s so important to always keep your eyes on the goal.


•    Reliance on structure: perhaps better demonstrated by the passion and somewhat disorganisation of the Brazilians, having a structure in place is vital. The German team knew their places, how they had to work for each other and what to do in certain situations. Having a structure in place, along with rules is necessary if any business wants to see success.


•    Stay humble, passionate and genuine: as perhaps personified most by Schweinsteiger, the Germans were the epitomy of class. There is no place for egos in a team and we witnessed this throughout the competition even when they managed to put 7 goals past the hosts. Just as in business, you need to temper any sense of superiority and just put your head down and do the best job you can.


Author: Désirée Gergen is about to graduate in an MA in Intercultural Communication for Business and Professions at Birkbeck College, University of London.

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Managing Multicultural Teams: A Participant's Feedback

Managing Multicultural Teams: A Participant's Feedback

We ran a Managing Multicultural Teams open course on January 30th. We asked one of the participants to tell us about her experience of the open course – what was covered, what her key take-aways were, and how this experience will be applicable back into her role at an international NGO.

 
What did the training cover?


The training was nicely structured but also informal at the same time allowing us (attendees) to ask as many questions and share our own experiences as we went along throughout the day. The training started with looking at how culture affects business and leadership.  We looked at how cultural self-awareness ties in with managing multicultural teams and we assessed our own cultural awareness, management and working/communications styles.


Afterwards we looked at the different levels of culture: the impact of corporate culture, national culture and individual culture. The session also examined team development and group processes - the influence of culture on the length of development stages of team development. Motivation, conflict resolution practices across cultures was also looked at as well as on how to give and receive feedback. Finally, we looked at the strategies for success – how to develop trust and build relationships with the team and create synergy within the team.


We had the opportunity to discuss and share our own values with the team. There were fun practical team building exercises throughout the day, which enabled us to better understand how to manage and work well within a team - and most importantly, to experience what is written in the slides rather than just listening throughout the whole day.


What was your ‘aha’ moment (ie. your key take-away)?


By looking at culture in depth and understanding it throughout the training, I began to think in terms of 'the platinum rule'. Essentially, this means to treat others how THEY would like to be treated – opposing to the famous saying 'treat others how you would want to be treated'. The emphasis throughout the training was on how THEY would want to be treated.


What will you apply back in your job?  


I will take on board with me that it is critical to be open-minded to all various situations. Even though you are not necessarily accustomed to a cultural practice, it is essential to do the best possible to comprehend situations in a cultural context (especially during  conflicts). With this, I think it is also important for me to take my learning in order to educate others through what I have learnt throughout the training. Culture is something that is instilled in each of us from a young age, however it can also be learned. It is therefore important to ask questions and dig deep.


Who would you recommend this course to?


I would recommend this training to anyone - as we live in a globalised world - which means understanding culture is essential and an individual will also be working within a diverse team - therefore I would say this training would benefit anyone. However, I think that it would especially benefit those working specifically in an international context, particularly those responsible for managing multicultural teams. This training could also be insightful for anyone who has not yet had experience working in an international background, however is looking to work within an international organisation.

If you would like to join our next course, please visit the Managing Multicultural Teams course page for more information.

Want this course in London? We are running this training course in London on 3rd April 2014 in London. Please refer to Findcourses for more information.

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