South West Training Blog

Articles, tips, guides and blogs around business skills, training, professional courses and development in addition to South West relevant news.

Hero or Villain? How would you be Portrayed in an Online Customer Care Story?

Hero or Villain? How would you be Portrayed in an Online Customer Care Story?

The Somerset County Gazette featured an article on 24th September outlining a family's disgust at the accommodation they were placed in when visiting a holiday site in Burnham on Sea (a seaside resort in Somerset).

The family report what can only be described as a nightmare for any family who has spent money in the anticipation of a relaxing holiday.  Stomach turning photographs and the family's account of cigarette ends under the bed, an ants' nest, filthy hob,insect clad skylight and a lack of safety equipment  all add to the horror of the story. To add further damage, the report outlines the alleged lack of customer care by the company in question when responding appropriately to the family's issues.

Since, the British seem to love stories of this nature then, without doubt it will have been 'liked', 'shared' and commented on.

Although the company in question defend their position, the damage has been done and the situation truly reflects the impact of such stories on the internet and social media streams. Failure to deal with a customer complaint immediately and to the satisfaction of the customer does - and will continue to result in individuals using the internet to air their grievances.

The impact of such stories comes at a significant cost to the company and can undo years of positive PR very quickly. The stories can result in cancellations by people with existing future bookings and also a decline in the repeat business of individuals who would otherwise frequent the resort regularly.

Since the potential for an individual to provide toxic PR for your company through a poor customer care attitude is boundless, then a well communicated customer care plan coupled with strict customer care expectations for all staff members is essential.   Customer care training should be a core commitment of all businesses with a recognition that the business is nothing without its customers.  This commitment should be manifest in management behaviour and attitudes and training should be compulsory for all staff members. Staff should fully understand the customer care standards that the company has in place and methods for responding appropriately to even the most difficult customers.  It is paramount that they appreciate the significance of protecting the reputation of their company in such interactions and the damage that can potentially be done by mismanaging the situation. Managers should then monitor the situation closely; listen to how staff deal with customers, understand the potential impact on the customer and intervene if they feel that the customer has not received the level of customer care promoted by the company.  Ideally, there should be zero tolerance for any negligence in managing customer care needs.

Companies should also consider formal complaint procedures which allow complaints to be formally documented.  Formal complaint documents allow a company to identify trends.  For example, is this issue repeating itself?  If so, what preventative actions should be put in place to stop it happening in the first place or, if it's an issue which cannot be prevented (for example the Burnham on Sea complaint involves the invasion of ants which is common on agricultural land) then what robust contingent actions should be in place?  It may also transpire that a particular individual is involved in an excessive number of complaints.  Where this is the case,  increased customer care training becomes essential.

Good customer care stories make the news too. For example, an incredibly uplifting story, published by the Metro, in which a McDonald's employee took the time and care to help a disabled customer eat his meal went viral recently. Although this story is a genuine act of respect and kindness by the employee, it makes fantastic positive PR for McDonald's. McDonald's are certainly the hero of this particular article. Even in the event of a complaint,  a company's commitment to good customer care makes it more likely that the company will receive positive PR. For example, individuals communicating via Trip Advisor, Facebook or other avenues may report that 'despite x,y or z being an issue the company were quick to resolve the situation and took the complaint seriously'. Such stories result in potential future customers feeling assured that if an issue were to happen that the company would take immediate action to resolve the situation and they are more likely to trust making a booking with the company.

It is paramount therefore, that you protect your company from the type of bad PR experienced by the company in Burnham on Sea and ensure that your customer care processes work effectively and that your staff have equal buy in to the importance of the standards and procedures. Check your processes regularly and consider a 'secret shopper' to assess the degree to which your staff promote your standards.

Training South West provide Customer Care training and related business training to companies across the South West, including Somerset, Dorset and Exeter.

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Managing Multicultural Teams: A Participant's Feedback

Managing Multicultural Teams: A Participant's Feedback

We ran a Managing Multicultural Teams open course on January 30th. We asked one of the participants to tell us about her experience of the open course – what was covered, what her key take-aways were, and how this experience will be applicable back into her role at an international NGO.

 
What did the training cover?


The training was nicely structured but also informal at the same time allowing us (attendees) to ask as many questions and share our own experiences as we went along throughout the day. The training started with looking at how culture affects business and leadership.  We looked at how cultural self-awareness ties in with managing multicultural teams and we assessed our own cultural awareness, management and working/communications styles.


Afterwards we looked at the different levels of culture: the impact of corporate culture, national culture and individual culture. The session also examined team development and group processes - the influence of culture on the length of development stages of team development. Motivation, conflict resolution practices across cultures was also looked at as well as on how to give and receive feedback. Finally, we looked at the strategies for success – how to develop trust and build relationships with the team and create synergy within the team.


We had the opportunity to discuss and share our own values with the team. There were fun practical team building exercises throughout the day, which enabled us to better understand how to manage and work well within a team - and most importantly, to experience what is written in the slides rather than just listening throughout the whole day.


What was your ‘aha’ moment (ie. your key take-away)?


By looking at culture in depth and understanding it throughout the training, I began to think in terms of 'the platinum rule'. Essentially, this means to treat others how THEY would like to be treated – opposing to the famous saying 'treat others how you would want to be treated'. The emphasis throughout the training was on how THEY would want to be treated.


What will you apply back in your job?  


I will take on board with me that it is critical to be open-minded to all various situations. Even though you are not necessarily accustomed to a cultural practice, it is essential to do the best possible to comprehend situations in a cultural context (especially during  conflicts). With this, I think it is also important for me to take my learning in order to educate others through what I have learnt throughout the training. Culture is something that is instilled in each of us from a young age, however it can also be learned. It is therefore important to ask questions and dig deep.


Who would you recommend this course to?


I would recommend this training to anyone - as we live in a globalised world - which means understanding culture is essential and an individual will also be working within a diverse team - therefore I would say this training would benefit anyone. However, I think that it would especially benefit those working specifically in an international context, particularly those responsible for managing multicultural teams. This training could also be insightful for anyone who has not yet had experience working in an international background, however is looking to work within an international organisation.

If you would like to join our next course, please visit the Managing Multicultural Teams course page for more information.

Want this course in London? We are running this training course in London on 3rd April 2014 in London. Please refer to Findcourses for more information.

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