South West Training Blog

Articles, tips, guides and blogs around business skills, training, professional courses and development in addition to South West relevant news.

Youth Theatre - Helping Kids to Perform Better

Youth Theatre - Helping Kids to Perform Better

The Octagon Theatre in Yeovil, Somerset will soon be entertaining families from across the South West with their festive production of Sleeping Beauty. I can't wait!! I love the pantomime and take the children every year without fail.  The cast are always fantastic and the kids always leave having had a great time.

I love the theatre.  Not only does it bond and entertain the local community but it also contributes to the economy and provides local dancing / acting schools with opportunities to include talented youngsters in productions. No doubt local children will be included in the Octagon Theatre production of Sleeping Beauty.  

Youth Dramatics groups are fantastic for young people.  I participated in such groups for years as a child and developed skills that would otherwise not have been developed until joining the world of work. If you have a child bounding with energy who needs an outlet, then consider getting them involved in a local group and I’m sure they’ll experience the same benefits that I did as a child. Yeovil is host to some great performing arts group and so too is Bristol which is home to the Bristol Youth Theatre Studio and the Bristol Old Vic Young Company amongst others.  Without doubt additional groups will be thriving across the rest of the South West.

The following areas outline just some of the key benefits for a child:

Rehearsing and performing in front of others teaches a child confidence.  This is a fundamental skill which most adults only develop as part of formal training when they enter the work place - typically in the form of 'Presentation Skills' training.

Every member of a theatre group, regardless of the size of the role, is a vital member of the team. This validation contributes greatly to a child's self-esteem, particularly when being applauded at the end of a production.

As with Presentation Skills training above, Time Management and Prioritisation are also courses that an adult will typically engage in when they enter the work place. Participating in youth theatre groups helps a child to develop these skills at an early age as they must learn to manage their time to allow for attendance at rehearsals and productions.  Ensuring that their personal time is well scheduled, ensures that they can give their maximum to their theatre group.

Team Work is another essential part of youth theatre. Not only must children work effectively with both peers and adults but they must also operate cross functionally; interacting with those who manage the stage set, lighting, artwork, costumes etc.  The beauty of team work in this capacity is that it is non-competitive.  It gives children a chance to engage with others on a basis that requires everyone to come together as equals without competing with each other.  This is often a welcome change for children who are otherwise immersed in competitive activities.  School itself tests children from an early age; ranking them in order of performance.  During tests, collaboration is forbidden and children must perform on their own merits.  During real life however, the world doesn't work like this. To exceed in the work place, collaboration and teamwork are essential to success. Being part of a theatre group enables children to acknowledge this and develop their skills through the fundamental role played by the team in delivering a fantastic production. They are certainly not penalised for drawing on the skills and expertise of their team mates as they would be in a school test setting.

Self-discipline is another skill developed by children who are part of theatre groups.  They may, for example, have to sacrifice hanging out with friends or going out for pizza for the sake of their theatre group. This is a hugely valuable personal asset.

This list is not exhaustive (I have failed to mention the opportunity to develop skills such as problem solving skills, creative thinking and abstract thinking amongst others) but at the very least it gives a good insight into the value that membership to a theatre group presents to a child.  

Without a doubt, theatre groups help your child acquire skills at an early age which put them at an advantage when it comes to harnessing opportunities in their adult lives. So, if your child is bounding with energy and needs a channel to direct this energy then consider getting them involved.


Maybe next year they'll be part of the cast of children supporting the Octagon Theatre Christmas pantomime!

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Do Blanket Training Policies Work?

Do Blanket Training Policies Work?

Training approaches differ greatly across companies and with experience working across large corporates through to small privately owned companies, I’ve found that the value and nature of the respective policies vary greatly in tandem.


Within the corporate world, my experience has been that there is a tendency to ‘pin everything down’ – if it can’t be measured, quantified and reported on, then the attitude is that efficiencies are lacking.  With the luxury of ample training budgets, the corporate world has the ability to arrange regular training courses which are delivered by fantastic trainers.  One would assume that the courses would be well received but my experience suggested that these programmes were not.


Often the training policies in place operated a blanket approach which ensured that staff working in particular areas would be trained in a, b, or c; regardless of delegate willingness.  I appreciate this is a need when health and safety or basic job training are at stake, but, what happens when they are not?


Having been a delegate myself on endless courses, I witnessed many people attend merely because the organisation expected them to attend and not because the delegate had opted to.  It was a day out of the office and a chance to have a buffet lunch with colleagues coupled of course with the opportunity to finish early (training often finishes by 4pm). I found that when the ‘want’ factor is taken away from the delegate then the return on investment expected by the employer wanes. They dutifully attended the training session, learn less than would be anticipated and then return to work for business as usual.


Ok, this might be a really negative perception and it’s not as black and white as I write, but there is a great deal of truth here.
When working in a smaller (and often more creative environments) where there was an absence of prescribed training programmes, I found that staff were more motivated to train.  In these particular environments I found that staff members would find something applicable to their roles, that they really enjoyed and would then request training.  The training would then be arranged in response to something that the staff member really wanted to do.  They were motivated to learn and got more from the programme.


When training works from the outside in, i.e. pouring information into a vessel that isn’t necessarily keen to be there, then some (if not all) the information often pours out through the other end.  When, however, the need is generated from inside out i.e. the individual has personally recognised a need for the training and has requested it, the vessel holds far more information. Learning is more likely to be retained and the individual is more likely to apply their learning within the work environment.


Note also the use of the word ‘learning’.  Within this context, learning can be perceived as individually inspired whilst ‘training’ can be perceived as externally instigated. I’m not saying ‘don’t have a training policy’, instead I think companies should really think through how the policy is applied.  Does training really need to be something that is quantified across the board?  Do all courses really need to be mandatory? Perhaps there’s a little freedom that companies can apply when thinking through their policy.  My preference is to present an environment in which, during one to ones and appraisals, employee and employer engage in a conversation which has as little ERTT (Employer Talking Time) as possible and enables the employee to talk about how they are doing in their role and personally identify potential learning paths which meet either current gaps in know-how with their role or learning opportunities to meet the needs of future roles to which they aspire.


As such, my ideal training policy is to ensure that managers know how to facilitate good quality discussions with their staff and are able to promote the learning topic as a key feature of their discussions with their employees.  If the employee recognises a need (and if it’s relevant to the company or the employee’s role) then consider allowing the employee to investigate possible learning or training environments.  It may even be that training which is not entirely related to a role is sanctioned as a retention tool.  A number of times in my role as Manager I have sanctioned Diplomas and other post graduate courses, not because they have directly benefited the role, but because I’ve known that the employee has a deeply held interest.  As such, sanction of such courses has become a retention tool in kind as the employee feels valued and perceives the employer as caring about their personal development.


In the most recent training policy I developed, I also ensured that staff returning from training / learning opportunities shared their learnings with other staff members.   These events are a great way to get teams together and to allow them to share knowledge and learning within an open environment with people they trust.  The sessions should be employee led and open floors should be allowed to ensure that other employees can contribute their opinions or experience of the subject matter. It also helps consolidate delegate learning through the action of relaying it to others.

To summarise, yes, training is important but I question training policies which are structured to such an extent that training is ‘imposed’ blanket like on employees.  My belief is that regular discussions in respect to learning and development are vital to identifying needs and allowing individuals to reach their own conclusions as to learning needs. Finally, bringing the training back into the work place and allowing the discussion of training points lends itself to greater training consolidation for the delegate and team building for the broader team.  
 

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Our Emotional Intelligence Training Course

Our Emotional Intelligence Training Course

Emotional Intelligence (EQ) is a trendy concept and no wonder why - it can help anyone in achieving success both in their personal and professional lives.

Employers are increasingly looking for candidates with interpersonal skills as they could be key to better adaptation and performance in the workplace.

Emotional Intelligence is being able to adapt to every social interaction using the right approach and also embracing a positive mindset, which helps to achieve success. This ability is crucial in order to have constructive conversations, (even difficult ones) and to lessen any negative outcomes that could come out of them. It also enables us to communicate effectively and respectfully. In other words, to be highly emotionally intelligent helps to take the best out of...  yourself!

Our Open Course

This month we had our first open course on … (I’m sure you’ve guessed) Emotional Intelligence.

The trainer explored the key ingredients of the subject and focused on the link between EQ and Leadership. What is a good leader? Someone who communicates effectively, who motivates the team, who can cope with unexpected situations: Someone highly emotionally intelligent.

The first step that was covered in the open course was how to become more self-aware. We need to know our strengths and limitations to change our behaviour and break with our bad habits. Throughout the session, participants we were able to take tests to raise their self-awareness.
The trainer then debriefed the participants and explored great communication concepts and skills that they could apply not only at the work place but in any interaction.

Lunch and Learn Session

This open course was for us the opportunity to do our first Lunch and Learn session! As one person from our London office attended the training, he recapitulated key learning points from the session in a presentation. He concentrated on the ‘Self-talk Cycle’ and how thoughts directly impact our performances. 

What is the Self-Talk Cycle? It is the cycle of the little voice in our head and the consequences of what it says to us. The concept explains that every thought provokes a feeling that triggers a behaviour, this seems logical. As logical as the fact that if when we are happy we perform better than when we are down. This scheme highlights the necessary of having a positive attitude to forge success. Our negative self-talk limits ourselves while positive self-talk enable us to surpass ourselves.

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What makes for the Perfect Training Centre?

What makes for the Perfect Training Centre?


Proximity

For a business it is good to have local facilities that avoids to go too far to find the right place. It saves time and money. This is the reason why we think that our training facilities can help regional businesses to develop.

Comfort

To learn, you need to be in the right conditions. Our rooms are spacious and comfortable. We want them to be right environment for you to bring away as much as you can, in the right conditions.
The training centre also includes a lounge. Perfect to have a break with some refreshments, it is also a good place to talk with the other attendees. It is available all day.

Adaptability

According to needs and expectations you would not need the same room organisation. Therefore we chose to have a room that can have different arrangements to set up the optimal lay out for the training.
The rooms can host up to 15 people. We also have also 2 smaller rooms (up to 8 people).

Experience

When you have no experience, you can make mistakes easily. We have got a 10 year experience in the field of trainings. It enables us to deliver high standard trainings.

Quality trainers

A training is totally useless if the trainer has nothing to learn to you. Our trainings are delivered by first class trainers. We only work with trainers have many years of expertise in various business sector as well as on the subject matter.

Attention to people

We think that respect is an essential value in life. If you come at our trainings you will find professionals that are passionate about how you learn and that make customer service their priority.

 

Written for Bob by training intern Elorn Causer.

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